What is this stuff? Cervical Fluids

“Typical” Cervical Fluid Pattern

While your cervical fluid pattern may vary from cycle to cycle and it may vary from woman to woman, a typical cervical fluid pattern looks like this:

Immediately following menstruation there is usually a dry vaginal sensation and there is little or no cervical fluid.

After a few days of dryness, there is normally a cervical fluid that is best described as “sticky” or “pasty” but not wet. While this kind of cervical fluid is not conducive to sperm survival these days may be considered as “possibly fertile” if found before ovulation.

Following these “sticky” days, most women generally notice a cervical fluid that is best described as “creamy”. This fluid may be white, yellow or beige in color and has the look and feel of lotion or cream. At this point the vagina may feel wet and this indicates possible increased fertility.

The most fertile cervical fluid now follows. This most fertile fluid looks and feels like raw egg white. It is slippery and may be stretched several inches between your fingers. It is usually clear and may be very watery. The vagina feels wet and lubricated. These days are considered most fertile. This is the fluid that is the most friendly and receptive to sperm. It looks a lot like semen and, like semen, can act as a transport for sperm.

After ovulation, fertile fluid dries up very quickly and the vagina remains more or less dry until the next cycle. Some women may notice small amounts of fertile-looking fluid after ovulation as the corpus luteum produces small amounts of estrogen, but you are not at all fertile after ovulation has been confirmed.

Cervical Fluid and Their Meaning

Dry – Probably Not Fertile

Sticky – Probably Not Fertile

Creamy – Possibly Fertile

Watery – Fertile

Egg white – Most Fertile

How can I tell the difference between fertile cervical fluid and semen?

If you find that you have more watery or eggwhite days than you would expect and that these often follow days or nights that you had intercourse, then you may be mistaking seminal and cervical fluid. They have similar properties because they share the same function: transporting and nourishing sperm. You will find, however, that fertile cervical fluid (eggwhite) is more clear and stretchy and shiny. It will stretch a couple of inches without breaking. Semen may be more whitish and is more likely to break when pulled.

If you are in doubt and it is near your fertile time, always record eggwhite cervical fluid, even if it may be obscured by seminal fluid. This way, you will not miss a potentially fertile time. Emitting semen immediately after intercourse by doing kegel exercises (which is sometimes recommended for people who are charting to avoid pregnancy so that cervical fluid is not obscured) is not recommended when you are trying to conceive. While most sperm reach their destination within your reproductive tract quite quickly after intercourse, you don’t want to sacrifice your chances of conception to have a perfect chart.
Taken directly from Fertility Friend

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