Can It Be Genetic?

It’s widly “known” that losses are not genetic. Doctors say there is no way that the trait can be passed down from either parent. Yet, when you ask the board if any of their immediate family members have had a loss, more say yes than no.

Interestingly, though, more say no than yes when it comes to infertility (secondary or initially) with a good chunk unsure.

The top Google searches when you type in “Are miscarriages….” pops up with genetic and hereditary. That’s not a coincidence.

Once you’ve had a loss, you know how much it’s out there, like a new world has been exposed. But why does it seem to pop up a lot in your own family?

Searching online and talking to doctors seem to bring up nothing. They’ll say it’s a fluke, a genetic abnormality (of your LO, not you) or that it’s just a coincidence. There seem to have been no true studies into why they seem prevalent in families.

Perhaps one day,family losses will be a factor into your monitoring during your own pregnancy. Maybe it will help to boost your check-ins or ultrasounds or even just your betas.

Until then, we’ll keep on keepin on.

Interesting articles to read:

Way Of Predicting Outcome Of Pregnancies With Miscarriage Threat Developed

Are Miscarriages Hereditary? A question on AllExperts.com

Multiple Miscarriages Linked To Gene– from 2001

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A different child

This poem was shared on the Pregnant After A Loss board and it was requested it be shared on this blog. It’s powerful.

A Different Child

A different child, people notice
There’s a special glow around you.
You grow surrounded by love
Never doubting you are wanted;
Only look at the pride and joy
In your mother and father’s eyes.
And if sometimes between the smiles
There’s a trace of tears,
One day you’ll understand.
You’ll understand there was once another child.
A different child.
Who was in their hopes and dreams.
That child will never outgrow the baby clothes.
That child will never keep them up at night.
In fact, that child will never be any trouble at all…
Except sometimes, in a silent moment,
When mother and father miss so much
That different child.
May hope and love wrap you warmly
And may you learn the lesson forever:
How infinitely precious,
How infinitely fragile is this life on earth.
One day, as a young man or woman
You may see another mother’s tears
Another father’s silent grief
Then you, and you alone will understand
And offer the greatest comfort.
When all hope seems lost
you will tell them with great compassion:
“I know how you feel.
I’m only here because my parents tried again.”

Author Unknown

"Genes for Pre-Eclampsia Discovered"

BBC Article

Scientists say they have identified genetic errors that appear to increase a pregnant woman’s chance of getting the potentially life-threatening condition called pre-eclampsia.

Around four in every 100 women develops this problem of high blood pressure and leaky kidneys during pregnancy.

Now researchers have found faulty DNA may be to blame in some cases, PLoS Medicine journal reports.

The discovery could lead to new ways to spot and treat those at risk, they say.

The US researchers from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis analysed DNA from over 300 pregnant women.

Sixty of these were otherwise healthy women who were hospitalised because they developed severe pre-eclampsia.

The remaining 250 were women who were being monitored for other health complications. Forty of these also went on to develop pre-eclampsia.

DNA analysis revealed a few genetic errors shared by five of the 60 otherwise healthy women and seven of the 40 “higher-risk pregnancy” women who developed pre-eclampsia.

The genes on which the errors were identified (MCP factor I and factor H) play a role in regulating immune response and the researchers believe this could explain their possible link to pre-eclampsia.

Scientists have suspected that problems with the immune system provoke many cases of pre-eclampsia because women with lupus and certain other autoimmune diseases – like 250 of the women in the study – have an increased risk of the disorder.

The researchers now plan to study more pregnant women and other genes to further their understanding.

Professor Basky Thilaganathan, spokesman for the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, said: “This work shows an association.

“At best genes like these might identify 10-15% of pre-eclampsia, so it’s relative importance may not be sensational. But it may allow us to study new treatments to prevent or delay the onset of pre-eclampsia and to know which women need closer surveillance.”

He said that currently the only real way to halt the condition was to deliver the baby. This can be relatively risk free if the pregnancy is nearing its natural end anyway, but can be risky if the baby is premature.